CSIRO, Deakin University Create Australia’s First Carbon Fiber

A car manufacturing plantAustralia’s manufacturing industry reached a significant milestone. It produced its own carbon fiber for the first time, joining an exclusive roster of carbon fiber producers in the world.

The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) partnered with Deakin University for the pioneer effort. The endeavor could provide a much-needed boost to the country’s manufacturing sector.

Carbon Code

CSIRO CEO Larry Marshall said that the country may now produce carbon fiber from scratch after the partnership became successful in “cracking the carbon code.” Paksmart.com.au knows there are only a few other producers of the lightweight yet strong material in the world. Like them, Australia will use a top-secret and patented recipe to manufacture carbon fiber. This is according to Marshall.

The project should catalyze to encourage more breakthroughs in manufacturing. That includes the modernization of an automatic cartoning machine.

Marshall also believes that CSIRO’s partnership with Deakin University will generate more jobs. These jobs will arise from the homegrown production of carbon fiber.

Material Strength

John Tsanaktsidis, CSIRO research director, said that the successful attempt to produce carbon fiber would serve as a basis on how they can improve to meet aerospace standards.

Due to its high rigidity and tensile strength allows manufacturers to use it for the mass production of new materials for aviation, satellite equipment, bicycles and even tennis rackets.

Marshall said that a carbon fiber industry could transform the country’s manufacturing sector. It can also maintain global competitiveness by focusing more on “high value” products than raw exports.

In November 2016, CSIRO urged the industry to “play to its strengths” through prioritizing “high value” advanced manufacturing.

Australia’s production of its carbon fiber may allow the country to remain competitive in the global manufacturing sector. Do you think the benefits of the material outweigh the costs of producing it?